Keynes and the classics
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Keynes and the classics two lectures on Keynes" contribution to economic theory. by Axel Leijonhufvud

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Published by Institute of Economic Affairs in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Keynesian economics -- Addresses, essays, lectures

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 46.

SeriesInstitute of Economic Affairs. Occasional paper 30, Occasional paper (Institute of Economic Affairs (Great Britain)) ;, 30.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsH11 .I47 no. 30
The Physical Object
Pagination46 p.
Number of Pages46
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4618692M
ISBN 10025527601X
LC Control Number77438211

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Keynes and the Classics Reconsidered is a collection of scholarly work re-evaluating Keynes's revolution in economic thought, both in the method of macroeconomic reasoning and in policy-making. This book brings together mostly a younger generation of economists to revisit Keynes's interpretation of the classics and its impact on macroeconomic theory and policy.1/5(1). Macroeconomics Keynes and the Classics General Theory Keynes argued that the classical model is not general. In the classical model, the foundation for the reasoning is notional demand and supply, which assumes market equilibrium. Keynes argued that his theory was more general, by allowing for the possibility of disequilibrium, with excess. John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes (CB, FBA), was a British economist particularly known for his influence in the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics. Keynes married Russian ballerina Lydia Lopokova in NB: Not to be confused with his father who 4/5. John Maynard Keynes, English economist, journalist, and financier, best known for his economic theories on the causes of prolonged unemployment. His most important work, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, advocated a remedy for recession based on a government-sponsored policy of full employment.

Keynes and the Classics – Part 3 – tied the previous conceptual development into the denial that there could be aggregate demand failures (Say’s Law), introduced the loanable funds market and discussed the pre-Keynesian critique (Marx) of the Classical full employment model. in the fact that Mr. Keynes takes as typical of "Classical economics" the later writings of Professor Pigou, particularly The Theory of Un- employment. Now The Theory of Unemployment is a fairly new book, and an exceedingly difficult book; so that it is safe to say that it has. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lekachman, Robert. Keynes and the classics. Boston, Heath [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors. Keynes and the Classics Reconsidered is a collection of scholarly work re-evaluating Keynes's revolution in economic thought, both in the method of macroeconomic reasoning and in policy-making. This book brings together mostly a younger generation of economists to revisit Keynes's interpretation of the classics and its impact on macroeconomic theory and policy.

viii The Economics of Keynes: A New Guide to The General Theory 3. THE PROPENSITY TO CONSUME A Patinkin and the proportional multiplier A Factor income and effective demand A The multiplier as a condition of market-period equilibrium A Hansen’s versions of the multiplier 4. THE INDUCEMENT TO INVESTFile Size: 1MB. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Leijonhufvud, Axel. Keynes and the classics. London, Institute of Economic Affairs, (OCoLC) "Mr. Keynes and the 'Classics' a Suggested Intepretation," John R. Hicks I. It will be admitted by the least charitable reader that the entertainment value of Mr. Keynes' General Theory of Employment is considerably enhanced by its satiric aspect. But it is also clear that many readers have been left very bewildered by this Dunciad. Keynes and the Classics – Part 4 – which began Keynes’ critique of Classical employment theory. Today, we finish the critique by John Maynard Keynes of the Classical labour market and extend his overall attack on Say’s Law by considering his theory of interest.